Koloa, Kauai, Hawaii seems like a mouth full - And it should be.

It is a small plantation town, butted up against Kauai’s south shore jungle, on the furthest northwesterly island in the Hawaiian island chain. It is our home, our history, our teacher, our friend, and our playground. Basking in the sun and shadow of the Hoary Head Mountain Range and majestic Mt. Haupu, we couldn’t have asked for a better location to celebrate our love of adventure.

The Aloha we receive and deliver each day to visitors and locals alike is a direct reflection of the history, culture, beauty, and mana of Koloa town, the Waita Reservoir, of Mt. Haupu, and the island of Kauai itself.

Come play with us.


Waita Reservoir

The Waita Reservoir is situated next to the Black Mountain Range and Mt. Haupu in Koloa, Kauai HI. Constructed in 1906, the Waita Reservoir was used as the primary water source for the Koloa Sugar Plantation. Expanded in 1931 to include 525 acres, it holds 23 billion gallons of water. The Waita reservoir is fed from the Waiahi-Kuia Aqueduct system and is home to a host of wildlife such as Muscovy ducks, Hawaiian Coots, Hawaiian Gallinule, Stilts, Pheasant, Hawaiian boar, and jungle fowl (chickens). The reservoir also hosts largemouth bass, small mouth bass, Peacock bass, Tilapia, and Koi. The koi found in the Waita reservoir are what remain from the Japanese camp gardens that existed in that region during the plantation years. The reservoir now sits on private Grove Farm property and can be viewed only by reserving a space on a tour with Koloa Bass Fishing, Kauai ATV or Koloa Zipline.


Old Koloa Sugar Mill

The Koloa Sugar Mill stands as a testimony to Hawaii’s booming sugar industry. From 1912-1996 The Koloa Mill was the highest producing sugar mill in the state of Hawaii. After the closure in 1996, the mill became a popular tourist attraction popping up in countless vacation photos and home movies. Closed to the general public, it is still a favored site for Hollywood movies.